5 Ways To Get Organised At Work


Since starting my new job last week, I have had organisation on my mind. I wanted to begin this new chapter with a clean, tidy and organised work life, and although sometimes things can get hectic, I feel I have managed (and will hopefully continue to manage) the art of organisation within the workplace.

Here are 5 quick tips on how to organise yourself so you are getting the most out of your workspace and work time…

  • Write lists

Something I have done for years (since I was in high school) is write lists. Whether it is a list of things I need to complete for the day, week or month, I find that writing things down at the start of the day/week/month can be really helpful in getting things out onto paper. Take a moment each morning while you drink your first of many coffees for the day and write down the important tasks you need to complete/start on. When you have completed a task, cross it out – it feels so satisfying to see your list decrease as time goes on, and it also keeps you up to speed in the instance of someone asking you for a status report. If it’s crossed out, it’s done!

  • Prioritise

Taking the above List tip to another level is the art of prioritisation. Write your list and then take a moment to go through your tasks and have a think: what needs to be done ASAP? What can wait a day? Number your items from 1 (most important) to help you organise what you need to achieve. Another really important thing with prioritisation is speaking up and asking questions. If 3 people give you work that needs to be done ‘ASAP’, sometimes asking when exactly the task needs to be done can help ease stress. Sometimes people are happy to wait a day or two for things and others need things arranged right away. Speak up so that you aren’t caught in the middle of a rush that may not be needed.

  • File

Group your paperwork into files and store them in the same spot. Same goes for digital files on your computer/laptop – the easier you group things together, the easier it will be to find them in future. Be basic with what you call your files (for example: Invoices, Bank Statements, Customer Records) and then break things down further if you feel it works better that way (for example: Invoices – May, Bank Statements – 2016, Customer Records – A-C). Remember to be very basic with the names you give your folders/files so that finding files in future won’t be a headache.

  • Use Microsoft Outlook’s ‘Calendar’and ‘Tasks’ Features

Take advantage of the tools you have to schedule and plan your days. Once you get the hang of Microsoft Outlook’s Calendar and Task features, it is so easy to not only keep track of your own productivity, but others’ as well. Calendar allows the user to create events and invite other attendees to the events, creating an event on their calendar as well. You can send Tasks to others with instructions on what is needed to be done and the date which it should be prioritised for. Once the task has been completed and ticked off, you will be notified. I find it really worthwhile to use whatever calendar feature your computer may have to really set out what time you are using.

  • Keep Tidy

This is really a given, but it needs to be said – clean up. Tidy your desk. Wash your coffee cup. Put your waste paper in the recycling or use it as note paper. File away books and bundle up your spare pens. The tidier your office/deskspace is will help you in the event of a stressful day and will hopefully make it easier when you are desperately needing to find a certain thing. Take 5 minutes at the end of each day to tidy so that you can arrive to a clutter-free area the next morning.


So, those were some of my tips on getting organised within the workplace. I’d love to know what your top tips are – a girl can never been too organised! Or maybe she can!
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Life Advice – 5 ways I harness my anxiety

After a less-than-positive day, I wanted to use my personal struggle with anxiety issues as a basis for this post.

Today was planned to be a very productive day, and from the moment my eyes opened this morning, I knew it would not be going according to schedule.

Anxiety of any form makes life incredibly difficult. Most days it is undetectable by others that I am struggling. And then there are days where it is out there, at it’s worst and available for the whole world to see.

This isn’t going to be the story about my past issues with anxiety, or a deep description of how it feels on my worst days to battle such a illness. The truth is: if you suffer from some form of anxiety disorder, you already know what it feels like.

I wanted to take what I have learned about harnessing my anxiety issues. I use the word ‘harness’ as that is exactly what we need to do – take the reins of the thing trying to control our emotions and our body and steer our anxiety to a safe place.

 

1.. Breathe

This is one I am sure you’ve heard before during moments where someone else can recognise you’re feeling overwhelmed. However, if you learn how to breathe for relaxation purposes, it can be incredibly calming.

There are YouTube videos which can help you with learning how to focus on your breathing during anxious times as well as an amazing app which I have been using for the past year. Taking a few minutes at the beginning of your day to (try) and centre yourself, your thoughts and your mind can really effect your overall wellbeing positively.

 

2.. Time Out

Not everyone has the ability to drop everything and take a sick day. However, taking time out during your day to be alone can be extremely helpful in clearing your mind and recharging your body. Whether it’s taking an hour in the morning to read, or spending some time in the evening watching an episode of your favourite TV show; doing ‘nothing’ and isolating yourself for a small time can really help defuse an anxious period.

 

3.. Write It Down

Having a place to write down how you feel on a daily basis can be really cathartic and also very helpful in the event of seeking help from a professional as you have your thoughts/feelings written down for reference. Don’t be afraid to be honest with how you feel on a daily basis, even trying to write down what setting/event you may have been exposed to during moments where your anxiety is heightened. Just as important, write about times when you’re feeling better, and how you might have been able to get your anxiety under control.

 

4.. Work Out

Now, I’m not one to tell you to get on the treadmill for 30 minutes, followed by a pilates session every morning…but, sometimes moving and working out does help with releasing tension, focusing on yourself and gaining some endorphins from whatever makes you work up a sweat. Try and find 20 minutes a day to go for a walk outside (fresh air does wonders for the soul), or put on a work out DVD or find a video on YouTube to follow which might be entertaining to try.

 

5.. Talk To Someone

As much as the thought of talking to a complete stranger about our anxiety and personal issues seems frightening (and, well, it is for the first session), getting help is sometimes exactly what we need to find a better path for us to continue learning about ourselves.

Speaking as someone who has seen a counsellor before, sometimes all you may need is someone you don’t know to tell you that how you are feeling is okay. Knowing that you are not the only one feeling the way you are can be comforting and also can be incredibly beneficial when you are seeking help.

If you are after someone to talk to over the phone, whether it’s due to an urgent matter, or you don’t wish to be seen face-to-face, there are also phone helplines which are designed to speak with people any time of the day or night (and they are usually a free call, too).

 

Your mental health is important. How you feel on a daily basis is important. My hope is that the next generation are able to speak out about their anxiety issues with more support and understanding that the generations before us.

You are never alone in your struggle and please remember that it is never too late to reach out if you think you need a helping hand in harnessing your anxiety issues, no matter how big or small they may seem.

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